Literary Festivals, Prizes and Publications: Satis Shroff

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Global Poets & Writers Create Festivals and Publications
by Satis Shroff
National literature no longer means very much, the age of world literature is due.

(National literature will jetzt nicht viel sagen,
die Epoche der Weltliterature ist an der Zeit
— Goethe).


Global writers and poets are connecting internationally via the internet. Why should only the literature mainstream in the USA, Australia and Britain take the lead?The world literature propagated was entirely Eurocentric and Goethe himself was a German universal writer one of the most original and powerful German lyric poets and his Faust I & II is a melange of comedy, tragedy, pathos, wit and satire, that is, magical beauty.

However, his collection of pseudo-oriental lyrics ‘West-östliche Divan’ (1819) is closed associated with Marianne von Willemer, one of the most gifted and intellectual women in Goethe’s life. Goethe spoke of world literature during his times. But what we experience today is global literature, which is not a western literature with national borders. It is definitely post-colonial, post-ethnic and post-national. You could call it non-whitey, non-mainstream literature. This global literature is written by writers and poets who have left their homes for diverse reasons and are, of course put into the ‘migrant literature category.

This global literature is nervous, vibrant, dynamic and these writings have had a quiet existence since decades nut isn’t being noticed by the greedy, sensation-seeking mainstream publishers from the former colonial nations based in the UK, USA, and its ally Australia, Japan, France and Germany. These global writer and poets have, due to their migration, changed their cultures and adopted new languages of the host countries. These authors came and still come from Asia, Africa, Caribbean isles and since they’re obliged to write not in their mother-tongues, they take to literature like fish in water, observing and comparing their new experiences with the old, and write about their lives as global travellers and existential trespassers of international boundaries not only in their lives but also in their minds.

It is a sad fact that the literary market is dominated by Anglo-Americans throughout the world. With Behari, Nepali, Gujerati, Bengali or Malay alone you couldn’t reach the world market which is still dominated by the English language. Would the world have seen and read Tagore’s Gitanjali or Shakuntala if it hadn’t been translated into English? The Nobel Prize for Literature to a Bengali poet has inspired generations of Bengalis and others in the Indian subcontinent, as have the Man Booker Prizes for Rushdie, Kiran Desai and Pulitzer Prize and PEN/Hemingway Award for Jhumpa Lahiri.

Why are Nigerian Chinua Achebe’s books well known in the world than the ones of those of African writers writing in their own mother tongues? If Ngugi wa Thiong’o hadn’t moved to the Britain and later to the USA, why, he wouldn’t have become a professor for comparative literature and performance studies at New York University in 1992.

It is high time that the upcoming authors from the Southern Hemisphere (South America, Africa South Asian and South-East Asia got together and made their own literary world, with book publications, poetry events and awards. It is time that such writers and poetry associations around the world got together and created their own prominent poetry festivals to combat the discrimination going on in the world’s publishing markets. Global literature is here to stay as a resurrection from the ashes of bitter post-colonial experiences and thanks to the proliferation of social media and e-books. Down with the discriminatory Anglo-American, French and German mainstream literature markets that have been ignoring and discriminating global poets and writers.

The fall of the British, French, Dutch and other empires led to changes in relations with these powerful countries and resulted in revolutions as far as east-west relations were concerned. It was also a catalyst for great migration waves because the western cities destroyed during the World War II had to be reconstructed, factories renovated and rebuilt and manpower was missing. Most able men in these countries were injured, crippled or dead. And so the migration brought also changes in these western societies.

In most of the narratives of the global writers and poets the theme of identity takes a central position. Who am I? What am I doing here in this foreign world that I have embraced? Where do I belong? Questions about the hybridity, acculturation and integration, mixed cultures and multiple-identities arise, as men and women of different ethnic backgrounds marry, bring for progeny. Does migration lead to a loss of identity or it a win-win and thus enriching situation? The global authors write a literature of being in-between and growing within foreign cultures that they have accepted. They write about the changes and exchanges between two cultures and the question of: ‘Where do I belong?’ is raised. Is it a world in transition? An improvised life for a temporary period?

In the case of the asylum-seekers the question of the stay-permit or the green card, as the case may be, hangs like a Damocles Sword above the writer or poet. A toleration? A Duldung? Or will my asylum-request be refused and I’ll be obliged to board the next plane to my country?

A lot of writers and poets from ex-colonial countries like India, Pakistan, Nigeria, Iraq, Somalia, Ethiopia have to chew on the mistakes and fatal decisions made by those in power during the pregnancy, birth or miscarriage of their respective countries. The hatred between the Hindus of India and the Muslims of West Pakistan is a glaring example of how the partition of a country should not have been carried out. The British left the Indian subcontinent without solving the Indo-Pakistani problem. The result was a historical mayhem, anarchy, chaos and mobocracy. In other countries independence from colonialists led to dictatorships, civil wars, economic crisis, wanton corruption and open or hidden nepotism.

The colonialists interfered not only in the politics and economies of these countries but also in the socio-cultural lives of these people and had regarded them as being ‘inferior’ to their own British, French, Dutch, Portugese, Spanish and so-called Australian (actually imported Brit) cultures. There was no collective psycho-therapy for these unfortunate people, who were left on their own when the colonial powers retreated. Left to their meagre means to exist because their country’s wealth had been plundered and stolen ‘legally’ by the colonialists. Even today the treasures from the former colonies can be seen for a fee in the British, French, Belgian, German and Rijks (Netherlands) museums.

Like Goethe wrote in ‘Der Gross Cophta, II:

You must either conquer and rule
Or serve and lose,
Suffer or triumph,
Be the anvil or the hammer

Even the history of India has to be re-constructed and re-written by modern writers for the books from the colonial times had a jaundiced perspective and viewpoint. Asian countries and its people are badly described by the Brits and French in their versions. It’s high time that Asians described the Brits, French and other colonial characters in novels and poems through their own eyes and show the world what it was like to live under colonial rule and of how the traditions, beliefs, religions and cultures were ignored and ridiculed by the masters of the empire.

Writers that written with a heart for the downtrodden in the former colonies are undoubtedly V S Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Joseph Conrad, Alexander Hemon, Hanif Kureishi, JM Coetzee and Michael Ondatje. It is amazing how many poets and poetesses there are in the different websites around the world. This is a commendable and formidable resource and must be channelled to produce not only festivals but also works of literature for posterity. In this context I’d like to mention Epitacio Tongohan of Pentasi B World Freiendship Poetry, Leyla I??k from Kibatek,Turkey, Maria Miraglia and Saverio Sinopoli from the Neruda Association from Italy and India’s Manthena Damodara Chary’s endeavours to bring out certificates and anthologies of the best poems on his websites and now we have Singapore Writers under Hj Harisharis Hj Hamzah with a taste of Malay and Singaporean Poetry at an international event in 2018.

Dankeschön, thank you, merci, grazie, gracias, dhanyavad.
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Prosepoem: SONGS OF LOVE & SORROW (Satis Shroff)

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This time Satis Shroff tells you in his prosepoem about Nepal’s Wandering Minstrels called Gaineys, who go from village to village throughout the country and beyong Northern India with their crude versions of the violin and sing about kings, princesses, love-stories..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EcVBmaIkic

Prosepoem: A Minstrel’s Songs of Love and Sorrow (Satis Shroff)

Go away, you maya. Disappear. Haunt me not in my dreams.. What has become of my country? My grandpa said: “In Nepal even a child Can walk the countryside alone.” It’s just not true, not for a Nepalese, born with a sarangi in his hand. I’m a musician, one of the lower caste in the Hindu hierarchy. I bring delight to my listeners, hope to touch the hearts of my spectators.

I sing about love, hate and evil, kings and queens, princes and princesses, The poor and the rich, and the fight for existence, in the craggy foothills and the towering heights of the Himalayas, the Abode of the Snows, where Buddhist and Hindu Gods and Goddesses reside, and look over mankind and his folly. I was born in Tanhau, a nondescript hamlet in Nepal, were it not for Bhanu Bhakta Acharya who was born here, the Nepalese poet who translated the Ramayana, from high-flown Sanskrit into simple Nepali for all to read.

I remember the first day my father handed me a sarangi. He taught me how to hold and swing the bow. I was delighted with the first squeaks it made, as I moved the bow on the taught horsetail strings. It was as though my small sarangi was talking with me in its baby-talk. I was so happy, I and my sarangi, my sarangi and me. Tears of joy ran down my cheeks. I was so thankful. I touched my Papa’s feet, as is the custom in the Himalayas. I could embrace the whole world. My father taught me the tones, and the songs to go with them, for we gaineys are minstrels who wander from place to place, like gypsies, like butterflies in Spring. We are a restless folk to be seen everywhere, where people dwell, for we live from their charity and our trade.

The voice of the gainey, the sad melody of the sarangi. A boon to those who love the lyrics, a nuisance to those who hate it. Many a time, we’ve been kicked and beaten by young people who prefer canned music, from their ghetto-blasters. Outlandish melodies, electronic beats you can’t catch up with. Spinning on their heads, hip-hopping like robots, not humans. It’s the techno, ecstasy generation. Where have all the old melodies gone? The Nepalese folksongs of yore? The song of the Gainey?

“This is globanisation,” they told me.

The grey-eyed visitors from abroad, ‘Quirays’ as we call them in Nepal. Or ‘gora-sahibs’ in Hindustan. The quirays took countless pictures of me, with their cameras, gave handsome tips. A grey-haired elderly didi with spectacles, and teeth in like a horse’s mouth, even gave me a polaroid-picture of me with my sarangi, my mountain violin. Sometimes, I look at my fading picture and wonder how fast time flows. My smile is disappearing, grey hair at the sides, the beginning of baldness. I’ve lost a lot of my molars, at the hands of the Barbier from Muzzafapur in the Indian lowlands; he gave me clove oil to ease my pain, as he pulled out my fouled teeth in an open-air-surgical salon, right near the Tribhuvan Highway.

I still have my voice and my sarangi, and love to sing my repertoire, even though many people sneer and jeer at me, and prefer Bollywood texts from my voice-box. To please their whims, I learned even Bollywood songs, against my will, eavesdropping behind cinema curtains, to please the western tourists and my country’s modern youth, I even learned some English songs.

Oh money, dear money. I’ve become a cultural prostitute. I’ve done my zunft, my trade, an injustice, but I did it to survive. I had to integrate myself and to assimilate in my changing society. Time has not stood still under the shadow of the Himalayas.

One day when I was much younger, I was resting under a Pipal tree which the tourists call Ficus religiosa, when I saw one beautiful tourist girl. I looked and smiled at her. She caressed her hair, And smiled back. For me it was love at first sight. All the while gazing at her, I took out my small sarangi, with bells on my fiddle bow and played a sad Nepali melody composed by Ambar Gurung, which I’d learned in my wanderings from Ilam to Darjeeling. I am the sky and you are the soil; even though we yearn a thousand times, we cannot come together. I was sentimental at that moment. Had tears in my eyes.

When I finished my song, the blonde woman sauntered up to me, and said in a smooth voice, ‘Thank you for the lovely song. Can you tell me what it means?’

I felt a lump on my throat and couldn’t speak for a while. Then, with a sigh, I said, ‘We have this caste system in Nepal. When I first saw you, I imagined you were a fair bahun girl. We aren’t allowed to fall in love with bahunis. It is a forbidden love, a love that can never come true. I love you but I can’t have you.’

‘But you haven’t even tried,’ said the blonde girl coyly.

‘I like your golden hair, Your blue eyes. It’s like watching the sky.’

‘Oh, thank you. Danyabad. She asked: ‘But why do you say: ‘We cannot be together?’

‘We are together now,’ I replied, ‘But the society does not like us gaineys from the lower caste. The bahuns, chettris castes are above us. They look down upon us.’

‘Why do they do that?’ asked the blonde girl.

I spat out: ‘Because they are high-born. We, kamis, damais and sarkis, are dalits. We are the downtrodden, the underdogs of this society in the foothills of the Himalayas.’

‘Who made you what you are?’ she asked.

I told her: ‘The Hindu society is formed this way: once upon a time there was a bahun, and from him came the Varnas. The Vernas are a division of society into four parts. Brahma created the bahuns from his mouth. The chettris, who are warriers came from his shoulder, the traders from his thigh and the servants from the sole of his feet.’

‘What about the poor dalits?’ quipped the blonde foreigner.

‘The dalits fell deeper in the Hindu society, And were not regarded as full members of the human race. We had to do the errands and menial jobs that were forbidden for the higher castes.’

‘Like what?’ she asked.

‘Like disposing dead animals, making leather by skinning hides of dead animals, cleaning toilets and latrines, clearing the sewage canals of the rich, high born Hindus. I am not allowed to touch a bahun, even with my shadow, you know.’

‘What a mean, ugly system,’ she commented, and shook her head. ‘May I touch you?’ she asked impulsively. She was daring and wanted to see how I’d react.

‘You may,’ I replied. She touched my hand, Then my cheeks with her two hands. I found it pleasant and a great honour.

I joined my hands and said sincerely, ‘Dhanyabad.’ I, a dalit, a no-name, a no-human, has been touched by a young, beautiful woman, a quiray tourist, from across the Black Waters we call the Kalapani.’

A wave of happiness and joy swept over me. A miracle had happened. Like a princess kissing a toad, in fairy tales I’d heard. Perhaps Gandhi was right: I was a Child of God, a harijan, and this fair lady an apsara.

She, in her European mind, thought she’d brought the idea of human rights at least to the gainey, this wonderful wandering minstrel, with his quaint fiddle called sarangi.

She said in her melodious voice, ‘In my country all people are free and equal, have the same rights and dignity. All humans have common sense, a conscience, and we ought to meet each other as brothers and sisters.’

I tucked my sarangi in my armpit, Clapped my hands and said:

‘Namaste! That’s nice. Noble thoughts. It works for you here, perhaps. But it won’t work for me,’ Feeling a sense of remorse and nausea sweep over me.
© satisshroff, germany 3/3/2010

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Comments:
thelma zaracostas (australia): Hi Satis! Strong discriptive writing Satis, great poem.Nice to see you here at voices, once again great poem hope you stay awhile!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EcVBmaIkic

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A VOICE FROM THE SCHWARZWALD: SATIS SHROFF

A VOICE FROM THE SCHWARZWALD: SATIS SHROFF

Satis Shroff's ZEITGEISTLITERATURE | Just another WordPress.com ... https://satisshroff.wordpress.com/

Satis Shroff ist Dozent, Schriftsteller, Dichter und Künstler. Er hat sechs Bücher geschrieben: Im Schatten des Himalaya (Gedichte und Prosa), Through Nepalese Eyes (Reisebericht), Katmandu, Katmandu (Gedichte und Prosa mit Nepali autoren) Glacial Whispers (Gedichtesammlung zwischen 1997-2010). Er hat zwei Sprachführer im Auftrag von Horlemannverlag und Deutsche Stiftung für Entwicklungsdienst (DSE) geschrieben, außerdem drei Artikeln über die Gurkhas, Achtausender und Nepals Symbolen für Nelles Verlags ‚Nepal’ und über Hinduismus in „Nepal: Myths & Realities (Book Faith India). Sein Gedicht „Mental Molotovs“ wurde im epd-Entwicklungsdienst (Frankfurt) veröffentlicht. Seine Lyrik sind in Slow Trains, International Zeitschrift, World Poetry Society (WPS), New Writing North, Muses Review, The Megaphone, Pen Himalaya, Interpoetry publiziert worden. Er ist ein Mitglied von Writers of Peace, poets, essayists, novelists (PEN), World Poetry Society (WPS) usw.

Satis Shroff lebt in Freiburg (poems, fiction, non-fiction) und schreibt über ökologische, medizin-ethnologische und kultur-ethnische Themen und singt beim www.mgv-kappel.de und…

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A VOICE FROM THE SCHWARZWALD: SATIS SHROFF

Satis Shroff ist Dozent, Schriftsteller, Dichter und Künstler.  Er hat sechs Bücher geschrieben: Im Schatten des Himalaya (Gedichte und Prosa), Through Nepalese Eyes (Reisebericht), Katmandu, Katmandu (Gedichte und Prosa mit Nepali autoren) Glacial Whispers (Gedichtesammlung zwischen 1997-2010).  Er hat zwei Sprachführer im Auftrag von Horlemannverlag und Deutsche Stiftung für Entwicklungsdienst (DSE) geschrieben, außerdem drei Artikeln über die Gurkhas, Achtausender und Nepals Symbolen für Nelles Verlags ‚Nepal’ und über Hinduismus in „Nepal: Myths & Realities (Book Faith India). Sein Gedicht „Mental Molotovs“ wurde im epd-Entwicklungsdienst (Frankfurt) veröffentlicht. Seine Lyrik sind in Slow Trains, International Zeitschrift, World Poetry Society (WPS), New Writing North, Muses Review, The Megaphone, Pen Himalaya, Interpoetry publiziert worden. Er ist ein Mitglied von Writers of Peace, poets, essayists, novelists (PEN), World Poetry Society (WPS) usw.

Satis Shroff lebt in Freiburg (poems, fiction, non-fiction) und schreibt über ökologische, medizin-ethnologische und kultur-ethnische Themen und singt beim www.mgv-kappel.de und Gesangverein Frohsinn-Littenweiler. de.

Er hat Zoologie und Botanik in Nepal, Sozialarbeit und Medizin in Freiburg und Creative Writing in Freiburg und UK studiert. Da Literatur eine der wichtigsten Wege ist, um die Kulturen kennenzulernen, hat er sein Leben dem Kreatives Schreiben gewidmet. Er hat als Dozent in Basel (Schweiz) und in Deutschland an der  Akademie für medizinische Berufe (Uniklinik Freiburg) und VHS-Freiburg und VHS-Dreisamtal gearbeitet. Ihm wurde der DAAD-Preis, Pablo Neruda Award 2017 und Heimatmedaille Baden Württemberg 2018 verliehen.

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Satis Shroff: Dozent, Schriftsteller, Künstler, musikalish beteiligt im Mgv-Kappel und Gesangverein Frohsinn in Littenweiler, geehrt mit dem Neruda Award 2017 und Heimatmedaille Baden Württenberg 2018.

Schwarzwald Songs at St. Peter
Heimatmedaille Baden-Württemberg 2018: Literature & Heimatpflege
Mit dem Bundespräsident Gauck und Kretschmer in Stuttgart
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Medieval Freiburg

O, FREIBURG (Satis Shroff)

O, Freiburg! March 24,1599 was the day.

Three women were sentenced as witches and killed.

To think this town organized a reception,

For Marie Antoinette on May 4, 1770

It also deported its 375 Jewish citizens

On October 1940 to Gurs and Auschwitz.

As if in a heavenly wrath,

Freiburg was reduced to rubble and ashes,

Heaven seemed to be glowing;

Clouds began to melt and burn over the town.

A scenario within twenty minutes,

Created by the Royal Air Force.

Twenty minutes that were burnt

Into the collective memory of the Freiburger.

Frau Adolph and my mother-in-law still talk

About it when we have a coffee afternoon

With Schwarzwäldertorte.

Frau Adolph says: ‘ Freiburg was razed to the ground.

Stones, roof-bricks, broken glass, kaput windows

Singed curtains, burnt books, files in smithereens.

A traumatic nightmare.’

But I’m proud Freiburger have developed,

Both mentally and socially,

For today we are the hosts of Syrian war refugees.

In the nineties we made skinheads take off their Springerstiefel,

Life Asians entering a sacred temple.

We’ve developed a heart for humanity,

That is worthy of emulation.

Tolerance, togetherness, mutual respect,

That’s my university town Freiburg.

Where partner cities are welcome,

From Matsuyama, Isfahan, Guilford,

Madison and Barcelona.

Where war refugees find a safe haven,

And experience a culture of welcome.

Historischen Kaufhaus, Freiburg

BOOKS By SATIS SHROFF, Germany

BOOKS BY SATIS SHROFF, Germany

TRAVELOGUE by Satis ShroffReview by Renate Mousseux. M.A. ED: Through Nepalese Eyes is a highly interesting, authentic story taking the reader through traditions and customs of 2 different countries. The stories are written through the Eyes of a Nepalese, hence the Title. We learn about the role of women, religious beliefs, political events, ethical and socio-economic situations in Nepal. We see comparisons of Europe and Asia and learn about the vast differences of life. This book is a must read, I recommend it highly. –Renate Mousseux. M.A. ED Body Language Expert, Professor of English, French and German USA

—————————————————————————-

„Die Schilderungen von Satis Shroff in ‘Through Nepalese Eyes’ sind faszinierend und geben uns die Möglichkeit, unsere Welt mit neuen Augen zu sehen.“ (Alice Grünfelder von Unionsverlag / Limmat Verlag, Zürich).www.lulu.com/spotlight/satisle

Through Nepalese Eyes
Through Nepalese Eyes, a travelogue by Satis Shroff 
Im Schatten des Himalaya
Im Schatten des Himalayas, a German book of poems by Satis Shroff

Themen der Geschichten und Gedichten sind u.a.: Kampf um Demokratie (My Nepal: Quo vadis?), Transition (Wenn die Seele sich verabschiedet), und die Stellung der Frau (Bombay Bordel, Nirmala: Zwischen Terror und Ekstase), die verführerische Bergwelt (Die Himalaya rufen, Die Sehnsucht der Himalaya), das Leben in der Fremde (Gibt es Hexen in Deutschland?), Soldatenleben und Krieg (Der Verlust einer Mutter, Die Agonie des Krieges, Kein letzte Sieg), Tod nach Tollwut (Fatale Entscheidung), Trennung und Emanzipation (Santa Fe), Migration und Fremdenhass (Mental Molotovs, Letzte Tram nach Littenweiler), Tourismus (Mein Alptraum, Die Götter sind weg), Alkoholismus (Der Professors Gattin), Gewalt (Krieg), Trennung (Die Stimme, Der Rosenkrieg), Nachbarn (Die Sommerhitze) und die Liebe (Der zerbrochene Dichter, Eine seufzende Prinzessin, Ohne Wörter), die Familie (Meine Maya), der Tod (An Carolin Walter, Wenn die Seele Abschied nimmt).

Katmandu, Katmandu
‘Kathmandu, Kathmandu ‘ is a book of poems in German and English by Satis Shroff

Satis Shroff’s anthology is about a poet caught between upheavals in two countries, Nepal and Germany, where maoists and skin-heads are trying to undermine democratic values, religious and cultural life. Satis Shroff writes political poetry, in German and English, about the war in Nepal (My Nepal, Quo vadis?), the sad fate of the Nepalese people (My Nightmare, Only Sagarmatha Knows), the emergence of neo-fascism in Germany (Mental Molotovs, The Last Tram to Littenweiler) and love (The Broken Poet, Without Words, About You), women’s woes (Nirmala, Bombay Brothel). His bicultural perspective makes his poems rich, full of awe and at the same time heartbreakingly sad. In writing ‘home,’ he not only returns to his country of origin time and again, he also carries the fate of his people to readers in the West, and his task of writing is a very important one in political and social terms. His true gift is to invent Nepalese metaphors and make them accessible to the West through his poetry.Author Spotlight: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/satisle.

Satis Shroff has taught Creative Writing in Freiburg and VHS-Freiburg and is the published author of six books: Im Schatten des Himalaya (book of poems in German), Through Nepalese Eyes (travelogue), Katmandu, Katmandu (poetry and prose anthology by Nepalese authors, edited by Satis Shroff etc). His lyrical works have been published in literary poetry sites: Slow Trains, International Zeitschrift, World Poetry Society (WPS), New Writing North, Muses Review, Pen Himalaya, Interpoetry. Satis Shroff is a member of “Writers of Peace”, poets, essayists, novelists (PEN), World Poetry Society (WPS) and The Asian Writer, www.https://satisshroffblog.wordpress.com/.

, Satis Shroff is an author, medical lecturer, poet, artist,singer (MGV-Kappel) based in Freiburg who also writes on ecological, ethno-medical, culture-ethnological themes. He has studied Zoology and Botany in Nepal, Medicine and Social Sciences in Germany and Creative Writing in Freiburg and the United Kingdom. He was awarded the DAAD-Prize.freiburgerzeitgeistlyriksatisshroff.wordpress.com › 2018/09/10 › heim…
Heimatmedaille Awarded to Satis Shroff – FREIBURGER …

Frankfurter Buchmesse 2019-Satis Shroff

10.09.2018 – Freiburger author, lecturer and Männergesangverein singer Satis Shroff was awarded the Heimatmedaille Baden-Württemberg am 7.9.2018 in ..freiburgerzeitgeistlit.blogspot.com › 2019/10 › n…
NAMASTE NEPAL KONZERT नमस्ते नेपाल 2019 (Satis …

http://freiburgerzeitgeistlit.blogspot.com/

http://satisshroff-contemporarywritings.blogspot.com/

Diese Seite übersetzenYou will find articles, poems,musings, essays by the author Satis Shroff, who is a lecturer, poet, author and singer (MGV_Kappel) and artist. He loves the …
http://satisshroffszeitgeistlyrik.blogspot.com/2014/01/satis-shroff-on-literature-and-writing.htmlSatis Shroff’s CONTEMPORARY WRITINGS: Satis Shroff On …

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Keywords: lyrics, ehrung von satisshroff, schwarzwald, catmandu, katmandu, culture prize, freiburg-kappel, mahabharat mountains …

O, FREIBURG (Satis Shroff)

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O, FREIBURG (Satis Shroff)

O, Freiburg! March 24,1599 was the day.

Three women were sentenced as witches and killed.

To think this town organized a reception,

For Marie Antoinette on May 4, 1770

It also deported its 375 Jewish citizens

On October 1940 to Gurs and Auschwitz.

As if in a heavenly wrath,

Freiburg was reduced to rubble and ashes,

Heaven seemed to be glowing;

Clouds began to melt and burn over the town.

A scenario within twenty minutes,

Created by the Royal Air Force.

Twenty minutes that were burnt

Into the collective memory of the Freiburger.

Frau Adolph and my mother-in-law still talk

About it when we have a coffee afternoon

With Schwarzwäldertorte.

Frau Adolph says: ‘ Freiburg was razed to the ground.

Stones, roof-bricks, broken glass, kaput windows

Singed curtains, burnt books, files in smithereens.

A traumatic nightmare.’

But I’m proud Freiburger have developed,

Both mentally and socially,

For today we are the hosts of Syrian war refugees.

In the nineties we made skinheads take off their Springerstiefel,

Life Asians entering a sacred temple.

We’ve developed a heart for humanity,

That is worthy of emulation.

Tolerance, togetherness, mutual respect,

That’s my university town Freiburg.

Where partner cities are welcome,

From Matsuyama, Isfahan, Guilford,

Madison and Barcelona.

Where war refugees find a safe haven,

And experience a culture of welcome.

Ah, Freiburg,

You lovely Schwarzwald metropolis.

I watch the reassuring lights of your houses,

From the windows and roofs,

People talking, gesticulating or in control.

I drink Darjeeling at the Greiffenegg castle,

See the twin towers of the Johanneskirche,

And Freiburg’s cathedral.

This year there’s no snow over Freiburg.

The new lifts for seven skiers,

Move downhill sans skiers.

That’s climate change for you.

With a mild winter and a white spring perhaps.

The Swabian Gate is bathed in yellow light,

The Dreisam trickles below the bridge.

The tasty autumnal wine is already in the kegs,

The vines have been pruned.

Tasty nectar flows down the wine drinker’s gullet.

I say ‘Ada!’ to the blonde waitress,

Who always has a friend smile and kind words,

Descend to the Schwabentor,

Walk along the romantic Konviktgasse,

Take a sharp turn near the Kollegium Bororeum.

Voila! I’m between the Münster and the historical Kaufhaus.

The Black Forest farmers and their wives

Are busy selling their green-wares in Green City Freiburg.

Vegetables for vegans,

Poultry and bacons for meat-eaters,

Bratwurst fried with onions as fast-food,

Or Kurdish yufka near the taxi stand.

The Siegesdenkmal is a reminder of Belfort,

An old memorial but politics has changes.

The French and the Germans: Hollande and Merckel

Do things together

And are no longer foes.

O Freiburg, you Green City,

You have embraced your share of Syrian refugees,

Have built houses for them,

The Freiburger have shown they are big hearted,

Integration has become desire of the day.

If there’s one town that’ll make it,

It’s this Alemannic stronghold.

I’m so proud of you.

* * *

©2016, satisshroff, all rights reserved

THROUGH NEPALESE EYES: SATIS SHROFF

FREIBURGER LITERATURE (Satis Shroff)

 

THROUGH NEPALESE EYES: SATIS SHROFF

Through Nepalese Eyes

http://www.Lulu.com/spotlight/satisle

 

‘Through Nepalese Eyes’ is about the journey of a young Nepalese woman to Germany to meet her brother, who lives with his German wife and daughter in an Alemannic town named Freiburg. It is a travelogue written by a sensitive, modern British public-school educated man. He describes the two worlds: Asia and Europe and the people he meets. There is a touch of sadness when his sister returns to her home in the foothills of the Himalayas.

(205 Seiten) Paperback:  €12.00 Download:  €6.25

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It cries to be written because there are seldom books written by Nepalese writers about themselves. It’s always the casual foreign traveler, trekker or climber who writes about the people in the developing and least-developed countries of the so-called Third World.

The likely readers are the increasing male and female tourists, trekkers, climbers from the whole world who make…

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ERNTEDANK: the Harvest Festival (Satis Shroff)

FREIBURGER LITERATURE (Satis Shroff)

THE HARVEST FESTIVAL (Satis Shroff)

Erntedank is the harvest festival,
The German Thanksgiving,
Celebrated on the first Sunday of October.
The richness of Nature is depicted
By bread, fruits and flowers.

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The ladies wear lovely silk costumes,
Displaying their exquisite stiching and sewing creations:
Jewellery, pompom hats and headgear with pearls,
Expressing their gratitude
To the church, God and Mother Nature.
The Alemannic bread of Kaiserstuhl is legendary,
A procession of bakers and vereine
Ends the Alemannic Bread Market in Endingen.
Neighbouring France is known for cheese,
Germany excels with 300 sorts of bread.

SDC12688SDC12726-002
It’s such a delight to watch the calves and cows,
Mooing with their big collar bells,
Moving languidly down to the Erlenbacher meadows,
Over the golden, russet, brown fallen and withered leaves,
Lain by the wind like a rich carpet.
Around the Goldberg Hall and the cloister,
The alpine air is filled with cow bells,
The…

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Ah, Sirmione (Satis Shroff)

Sirmione, Villa Cortine Palace, Piano

Ah, Sirmione (Satis Shroff)

Key words: sirmione, mastino della scala, catull, italy, italian cuisine, scaliger, gardalake, dolche vita, piazza carducci, ancient rome.

Sirmione is the town where Catull (85-54 BC) lived and who has gone down in literature with these words: ‘Greetings to you, you beautiful Simione, rejoice over the return of your master.’ So runs the verse of Catull, who enjoyed living in the estate of his family.

Image result for catullus
Gaius Valerius Catullus was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes. His surviving works are still read widely and continue to influence poetry and other forms of art. 


Ah, Sirmione: Where the Poet Catull Lived (Satis Shroff) Sirmione is a small peninsula like a tongue into the blue Garda Lake, where the flowers grow in a rhapsody of colours, where the slopes are green with a majestic panorama of the Alps in the background. Sirmione is the town where Catull (85-54 BC) lived and who has gone down in literature with these words:

‘Greetings to you, you beautiful Simione,

rejoice over the return of your master.’

So runs the verse of Catull, who enjoyed living in the estate of his family. Although the famous Grotto of Catull, which are the ruins of a Roman villa, built on one of the hills of Sirmione, complete with a thermal bath, carrying his name, Catull never lived there. On the tip of the half-island thee’s a 70 degree hot sulphur bath, the medicinal properties of which was treasured by the Romans. Today, a small museum give us an idea of the former beauty of the thermal path. The oldest church of the place lies on the outskirts of the centre and is the San Pietro in Mavino. One of the biggest attractions of Sirmione is the castle of Scaligero, a might fortification and the most beautiful Wasserburg in Upper Italy.

Image result for mastino i della scala

Mastino I della Scala, born Leonardo or Leonardino, was an Italian condottiero, who founded the Scaliger house of Lords of Verona. The son of Jacopino della Scala, he was podestà of Cerea in 1259, and then podestà of Verona.
Mastino I della Scala ordered the huge fortification to be built in the 13th century. It was a symbol for the power, influence and wealth of the renowned family. There’s a 30m tower which presides over the labyrinth of rooms, water surrounding fortification the fortification, draw-bridges, slits for shooting the enemies, stairs and a commanding view of the lake, and the land-tongue. The arms of the Scaliger (‘scale’ means ladder) is depicted near the Venetian Markus Lion which hangs from the entrance to the fort. The heart of the lively town is the Piazza Carducci.

Cars are banned here, except for expensive limousines of the well-to-do from Sirmione. There’s always an invasion of tourists who, like pilgrims, go up and down the small, narrow lanes.

Lake Garda, Sirmione, Italy, Travel

I love to sit in a café, sip an Italian espresso and watch humanity shuffle by, taking with them images of a medieval town, as they go unhurriedly along the via Vittorio Emanuele.

Sirmione, Garda, Tourism, Travel, Old

Sirmione, this beautiful peninsula, has a population of 5000 but during the tourist season it has to bear with over 10,000 visitors. Back from an Italian holiday at Lake Garda, Italy’s biggest lake,where the people are friendly,the cuisine to suit your gastronomic delights, where the water is cobalt-blue and the sky sunny and where there’s Mediterranean flair, for instance in Verona, the city know for its fashion, prominades and Julia’s balcony made famous by Shakespeare (Rome & Julia). It was a digital detox holiday: sans FB, sans FB, Twitter etc but with an opera at the amphitheatre in Verona. Belissimo!


Namaste Nepal in Freiburg 2019 (Satis Shroff)

NAMASTE NEPAL CONZERT 2019 (SATIS SHROFF)

Namaste Nepal Concert in Littenweiler on 9.11.2019. Pic courtesy: Beemu Shah Thakuri
NAMASTE NEPAL CONCERT: with Brigitte and Erwin Herth (Frohsinn-Littenweiler),Shankar Bogati (FNA chairman), Roshni Ayer, Nabin Dhungana, Samjhana Rijal and Romi Bhlon Tamang, Rajkumar Yonzan & others at Freiburg Littenweiler.

This year’s Namaste Nepal Concert was held at the Bürgersaal-Litterweiler. In the past the concerts took place in the Mensa I (Freiburg University) with the men’s choir from Kappel and in the Gemeindeheim-Kappel under the aegis of Art and Culture Association-Kappel. Since we have wintertime, the concert began early at 5pm. The intercultural event was organized by the Freiburger Nepalese Association and the Gesangverein ‘Frohsinn-Littenweiler’ and Satis Shroff.

The guests were greeted by Erwin Herth, the chairman of ‘Frohsinn’ after which the Frohsinn singers sang the song: ‘Wochenende und Sonnenschein’ made popular by Comedian Harmonists with text by Charles Ambarg and musical score by Milton Ager. Weekend and sunshine with you—alone in the woods. The second song was ‘Erlaube mir, feins Mädchen’ (Allow me, lovely maid), a song by Johannes Brahms, 1833-1897. Allow me, lovely maid, to go to your garden, admire the roses, to break one, for it is high time. Your beauty, your youth have made my heart glad.
Then followed a greeting speech and a small presentation about Nepal. The FNA has been doing social work, organizing such events with songs, dances and cuisine from Nepal. Most important of all is the good work done by the FNA e.V. in supporting poor children in Nepal with stipends, scholarships for education is the best gift to a child to make progress in life and widen his or her horizon.
Romi Bhlon then performed a dance to the song ‘Sanaima Sirbandi,’ a story about of a woman who puts on her traditional clothes among her girlfriends. She looks pretty in her clothes and sings about her beautiful dress and the glory of Nature.

 The choir ‘Frohsinn then sang a gospel song ‘Rock my Soul’ followed by ‘Heute hier, morgen dort.’ The translation goes: ‘today here, tomorrow there,’ about a man who travels and never complains    because it’s his own choice. He doesn’t count the years. He knows that no one misses him and it doesn’t bother him. But if someone asks him why he’s so, he can’t answer this particular question because what was new yesterday is old today.
Two Nepalese dancers Raj Kumar Yonzon and Sushila Bhattrai performed a Tamang cello from the hills of Nepal’ to the song ‘Sano ma sano.’ The dance is a tete a tete in which a boy meets his childhood girl-friend  after a long absence. He overwhelmed by her prettiness and tries to win her over and perhaps share a life together. However, the girl isn’t impressed by him.

In the intermission there were intercultural chats and chutneys, Nepalese cuisine comprising the traditional rice-linseed and hot, spicy, tasty vegetable sauces that you could wash down with masala tea—suitable for all palates.

After the intermission, pause in German, the Gesangverein ‘Frohsinn’ sanf two songs: ‘Abendruhe,’ a song composed by Wonfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), a moving song about the hard work during the day, and the evening his joy when the work ends. There are stars glittering in the evening sky and many heavy hearts on earth. A song of praise to the Creator who fills you with peace and serenity when the day’s done.
Kanon: This was followed by ‘Schön war die Zeit.’ The time was lovely. Now it has come to an end. We say: adieu. Auf wiedersehen.
समै रम्रो थिओ
अब समै आयोः
हामि भनौ फेरि भेटऔला

samai ramro bityo
aba samai ayo
hami bhanchhau-pheri bhetaula

Satis Shroff from ‘Frohsinn-Littenweiler’ sang ‘Yesterday.’

The FNA presented a last dance with dancers Samjhana Rijal, Roshani Ayer and Bimala Thakuri. He song was about a young girl in her puberty. She had seen a dream man when the sun had arisen. She’s deeply impressed by the attraction of the man.

Finally a song for everyone ‘Man Magan’ by Deepak Bajracharya that had everyone dancing on-stage in the Bürgersaal-Littenweiler. A beautiful evening came to an end with lots of namastes, which means ‘I Greet the Godliness in You.’
The concert was yesterday: 9th of November 2019 in the Bürgersaal- Littenweiler, and it was a great success and we all had a great time.

Dankeschön to all the participants and those who helped to organise it ( FNA eV and Frohsinn eV) and made it so successful. Grazie mille.

NAMASTE NEPAL KONZERT IN LITTENWEILER (Satis Shroff)

Die Gesangverein Frohsinnunter der musikaliscer Leitung von Ingrid Baccetta und der Freiburger Nepalesische Verein unter der Leitung von Shankar Bogati, Nabin Dhungana und Satis Shroff haben einen interkulturellen Konzert in der Bürgersaal-Littenweiler am 9. November 2019 präsentiert. Kappler Ulrich Maurer war für den Soundsystem zuständig. Es gab Choir gesang ua. von Johannes Brahms und W.A. Mozart. Auf der nepalesische Seite waren Volkstänze aus den Bergen Nepals in prachtvolle Trachten zu sehen. Getanzt haben: Romi Bhlon, Raj Kumar Yonzan und Sushila Bhattrai und Samjhana Rijal, Roshani Ayer und Bimala Thakuri. Satis Shroff sang eine Beatles Solo ‚Yesterday.‘ Im Anschluß gab es Spezialitäten aus Nepal und die Gelegenheit zum gemütlichen Beisammensein.

Bericht: Satis Shroff
(Twei Kappeler waren beteiligt in dem Konzert: Ulrich Maurer und Satis Shroff, beide von MGV-Kappel)

Namaste Nepal in Freiburg 2019 (Satis Shroff)

 
NAMASTE NEPAL 2019 (SATIS SHROFF)

This year’s Namaste Nepal Concert was held at the Bürgersaal-Litterweiler. In the past the concerts took place in the Mensa I (Freiburg University) with the men’s choir from Kappel and in the Gemeindeheim-Kappel under the aegis of Art and Culture Association-Kappel. Since we have wintertime, the concert began early at 5pm. The intercultural event was organized by the Freiburger Nepalese Association and the Gesangverein ‘Frohsinn-Littenweiler’ and Satis Shroff.

The guests were greeted by Erwin Herth, the chairman of ‘Frohsinn’ after which the Frohsinn singers sang the song: ‘Wochenende und Sonnenschein’ made popular by Comedian Harmonists with text by Charles Ambarg and musical score by Milton Ager. Weekend and sunshine with you—alone in the woods. The second song was ‘Erlaube mir, feins Mädchen’ (Allow me, lovely maid), a song by Johannes Brahms, 1833-1897. Allow me, lovely maid, to go to your garden, admire the roses, to break one, for it is high time. Your beauty, your youth have made my heart glad.
Then followed a greeting speech and a small presentation about Nepal. The FNA has been doing social work, organizing such events with songs, dances and cuisine from Nepal. Most important of all is the good work done by the FNA e.V. in supporting poor children in Nepal with stipends, scholarships for education is the best gift to a child to make progress in life and widen his or her horizon.
Romi Bhlon then performed a dance to the song ‘Sanaima Sirbandi,’ a story about of a woman who puts on her traditional clothes among her girlfriends. She looks pretty in her clothes and sings about her beautiful dress and the glory of Nature.

 The choir ‘Frohsinn then sang a gospel song ‘Rock my Soul’ followed by ‘Heute hier, morgen dort.’ The translation goes: ‘today here, tomorrow there,’ about a man who travels and never complains    because it’s his own choice. He doesn’t count the years. He knows that no one misses him and it doesn’t bother him. But if someone asks him why he’s so, he can’t answer this particular question because what was new yesterday is old today.
Two Nepalese dancers Raj Kumar Yonzon and Sushila Bhattrai performed a Tamang cello from the hills of Nepal’ to the song ‘Sano ma sano.’ The dance is a tete a tete in which a boy meets his childhood girl-friend  after a long absence. He overwhelmed by her prettiness and tries to win her over and perhaps share a life together. However, the girl isn’t impressed by him.

In the intermission there were intercultural chats and chutneys, Nepalese cuisine comprising the traditional rice-linseed and hot, spicy, tasty vegetable sauces that you could wash down with masala tea—suitable for all palates.

After the intermission, pause in German, the Gesangverein ‘Frohsinn’ sanf two songs: ‘Abendruhe,’ a song composed by Wonfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), a moving song about the hard work during the day, and the evening his joy when the work ends. There are stars glittering in the evening sky and many heavy hearts on earth. A song of praise to the Creator who fills you with peace and serenity when the day’s done.
Kanon: This was followed by ‘Schön war die Zeit.’ The time was lovely. Now it has come to an end. We say: adieu. Auf wiedersehen.
समै रम्रो थिओ
अब समै आयोः
हामि भनौ फेरि भेटऔला
 
samai ramro bityo
aba samai ayo
hami bhanchhau-pheri bhetaula
 
Satis Shroff from ‘Frohsinn-Littenweiler’ sang ‘Yesterday.’

The FNA presented a last dance with dancers Samjhana Rijal, Roshani Ayer and Bimala Thakuri. He song was about a young girl in her puberty. She had seen a dream man when the sun had arisen. She’s deeply impressed by the attraction of the man.

Finally a song for everyone ‘Man Magan’ by Deepak Bajracharya that had everyone dancing on-stage in the Bürgersaal-Littenweiler. A beautiful evening came to an end with lots of namastes, which means ‘I Greet the Godliness in You.’
The concert was yesterday: 9th of November 2019 in the Bürgersaal- Littenweiler, and it was a great success and we all had a great time.


Dankeschön to all the participants and those who helped to organise it ( FNA eV and Frohsinn eV) and made it so successful. Grazie mille.